Media

LCRA issues a moratorium on commercial dredging on the Highland Lakes TRAM appreciates the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) for taking the sensible and responsible step of reviewing the Highland Lakes Water Ordinance in order to protect the Highland Lakes’ water quality, aquatic life and public safety. Inc. DailyTrib.com, 02/25/2021

LCRA sets public meeting on proposed Lake LBJ sand dredging operation A public meeting regarding permits for commercial dredging on Lake LBJ has been set for 6 p.m. March 10 at the Kingsland Community Center, 3451 Rose Hill Drive. The meeting will be conducted by the Lower Colorado River Authority. DailyTrib.com, 02/03/2021

Rock Quarries targeted for new regulations. “A Texas House committee released its recommendations [see chart] and draft legislation on quarry operations earlier this month — and additional regulation may come to what many Texas property owners say is an unchecked industry.” – The Williamson County Sun 01/27/2021

TRAM Press Release “HIC-APO has released its final report and will present its recommendations to the 87th Texas Legislature. All seven legislative committee members, Terry Wilson (R), Armando Martinez (D), Alma Allen (D), J.M. Lozano (R), Andrew Murr (R), Jared Patterson (R), and Erin Zweiner (D), signed the report making it a truly bipartisan endeavor. The two APO industry representatives that had the privilege of being members of the HIC-APO declined to sign the final report.” 01/27/2021

TCEQ to Administer Clean Water Progrm, EPA Announces – The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality will administer the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today – EIN Presswire, 01/16/2021

Denied Again – Mesquite Concrete Batch Plant for I-635 Project will not go forward. Proposed batch plant would be located just a few hundred feet west of the Christian Care Center of Mesquite, a rehabilitation, assisted living and hospice care facility – East Dallas Greater Good, 01/12/2021

Air pollution a cause of UK girl’s death, finds global landmark ruling Ella Kissi-Debrah, who died in February 2013, is thought to be the first person in the world to have air pollution listed as a cause of death. CNN, 12/16/2020

Concrete and aggregate producers see regulatory bills filed for 2021 As quarries and rock crushers edge closer into residential areas, some people are pushing back, including state legislators who have filed six bills so far for the 2021 Texas legislative session that look to rein in aggregate production operations. DailyTrib.com, 12/10/2020

Midlothian cement pollution plan is moving forward, but residents are not stepping back. Holcim’s Midlothian plant is seeking to increase its maximum output of carbon monoxide from 4,300 tons to 7,100 tons per year. Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 12/07/2020


Families threaten to sue over wastewater released into Hill Country waterways. KVUE, 11/24/2020 “…despite more than 50 permit violations cited by the TCEQ, the state now allows Liberty Hill to expand operations to dump 4 million gallons per day”.


Local state rep proposes bills to mitigate impacts of concrete batch plants The Leader, 11/11/2020 State Rep. Jarvis Johnson is trying to minimize the impacts of such businesses all across the city and state.

Locals shaken by growing rock mining industry in Williamson County, push for reform Community Impact Newspaper, 11/05/2020 Williamson County is home to the most rock mining operations in Texas, which has led community members to seek stronger regulations as the negative impacts of the industry move closer to home.

Gunter concrete pipe plant begins construction without permit, residents respond KXII News, 10/07/2020 South Texas company, Ameritex, has started construction just outside Gunter for their concrete pipe plant, but residents say they don’t have a permit yet. They’re worried about their health and their town’s future.


State Rep. Terry Wilson, Chair of the House Interim Study Committee on Aggregate Production Operations, hosted 3 virtual town hall meetings featuring industry, academic and state agency experts, as well as input from Texans whose lives have been impacted by rapid APO growth. Watch Facebook Live recordings below:

APO Town Hall Day 1: APO Industry Impacts on the Texas Economy (09/29/20)

APO Town Hall Day 2: Environmental, health and infrastructure impacts of APOs (09/30/20)

APO Town Hall Day 3: Impacts of APOs on Texans (10/01/20)



TCEQ opens a public comment period on revised penalty policy proposal and begins Compliance History Rulemaking. …….”The penalty policy was last revised on April 1, 2014. Since then, statutory changes have occurred, and recent incidents have caused significant impacts to the public and the environment demanding accountability within the bounds of TCEQ authority.” 09/30/2020

Please send comments to: penalty_policy@tceq.texas.gov by 10/30/2020.



TRAM sounds alarm on mining “This isn’t just about our health or our quality of life,” stated TRAM member and rancher Bill McCabe of Kingwood. “This is about the Texas we will pass on to our grandchildren.” – The Highlander 09/29/2020


Sound off on Rock Crushing – Guest Essay by Rep. Terry Wilson – Williamson County Sun 09/27/2020



Below are a series of interviews done by Colette Nies, a candidate in the Comal County commissioners race, Precinct 3.  She interviewed 3 members of PHCE’s tech team covering water, health effects of pollutants from APOs, and air quality and monitoring. 

Episode 10: Jack Oliver, Geologist, discusses caves, quarries, TCEQ and protecting the Edwards Aquifer
Episode 11: Dr. Keith Randolph, Pathologist, discusses health effects of PM2.5, PM10 respirable crystalline silica.
Episode 12: Don Everingham, Mining Expert, on understanding air quality / air monitoring

Midlothian moms fighting cement plant’s pollution plan may be down to their last chance – Fort Worth Star-Telegram 08/25/2020


There are at least 188 concrete batch plants in Harris County, more than any other county in Texas. “Literally,” Texas state representative Armando Walle says “you can’t breathe.” – One Breath Partnership 08/12/2020 You don’t want to live near a concrete batch plant. But TCEQ lets it happen too easily


At the behest of industry, legislators have chipped away at the environmental permitting process in Texas, stacking the deck against concerned people protesting industrial projects.Texas Observer 07/02/2020 How Texas Lawmakers Weakened Citizens’ Rights to Fight Pollution


The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s (TCEQ) San Antonio Region is investigating an apparent breach in a tailing pond dam at the Anderson Columbia Tejas Quarry (ACCI) in New Braunfels. MyCanyonLake.com 06/03/2020 TCEQ Launches Investigation into Breach in New Braunfels Quarry’s Tailing Pond


KVUE and the Austin American-Statesman hosted a public forum in Marble Falls, Texas to address mining concerns from Hill Country homeowners. Left in the Dust: Public forum addresses quarry industry growth 10/07/2019


Since 2012 the number of registered quarries, rock mining operations and aggregate plants operating in Texas has increased 1,690%. Austin American-Statesman documents interviews with landowners and APO stakeholders. 09/25/2019

Watch Video


Communities clamor for regulation as the Texas mining industry explodes. Award winning documentation and three part video series reported jointly by the Austin American-Statesman and KVUE. 09/20/2019

Read More: A World Rocked

Watch Video Series:

Left in the Dust – Part 1 : More than 1,500 new residents are pouring into Texas every day. As they do, limestone and other minerals are necessary to build everything from houses to highways.

Left in the Dust – Part 2 : Some Hill Country communities are turning to lawsuits and incorporation in their fight against rock quarries.

Left in the Dust – Part 3 : For more than a decade Texas lawmakers have flirted with tighter oversight of the state’s multi-billion dollar rock mining industry.


Family Blames Environmental Violations for Illness – KABB FOX29 San Antonio – 11/18/2014 “There are permit violations dating back to 1991. If you were to stack these violations back to back there would be 160 years of violations.”